Friday, November 11, 2005

Happy Armistice Day!

Today marks the anniversary of the end of the First World War. Armistice Day is recognized in the United States of America as Veteran's Day and in most of the Commonwealth countries (including Canada) as Remembrance Day.

On November 11th, 1918 at 11:11 am the armistice went into effect and World War I ended. Over 15.1 million deaths are attributed to the war of which 6.5 million were civilian. Many of surviving soldiers had endured years of brutal trench warfare facing cold winters, gas attacks, and the 1918 super flu outbreak.

Here are a couple of good sites with Armistice Day information:

Remembrance Day - Australian site with many links for World War I and its impact on Australians. Covers the history of remembrance Day and why its name was changed from Armistice Day.

Millions fall silent in memory of war dead - CNN account of Armistice Day by Europeans in 2000.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT'S ARMISTICE DAY ADDRESS - FDR gave this speech less than one month before the USA entered World War Two.

2 comments:

Quel said...

You don't have to post this on the site, but I just thought I would le tyou know about this. I work with the Education Research project. We are looking for High School World History teachers to field test a chapter on the French Revolution in January 2006 for a major textbook publisher. The project is open to teachers in CA, NY, TN, NC, IL, MA, MI, MO and PA. The gratuity pay is $250 for each participating teacher.Please share this with any high school world History teachers you know. Thanks.

Also, I'm a blogger (homegirl.typepad.com) I ran across your site on a google search for high school world history teachers. Thanks for considering our project...current and future.

Raquel Dennie
Project Coordinator
www.educationresearch.com
redennie@educationresearch.com

John Potter said...

Indeed, World War I was perhaps a more horrific war than World War II (at least for the soldier involved in trench warfare). The war had a long-lasting effect on Europe's attitude toward war in general, balance-of-power relationships in particular.

John Potter
russian-history-blog.blogspot.com
jpotter@mail.com