Monday, March 12, 2007

King Leonidas and the 300 Spartans of Thermopylae

King Leonidas and the 300 Spartans of Thermopylae. This is an informative site dedicated to King Leonidas and the 300 Spartans, who along with 700 Thespians fought to the death defending the Pass of Thermopylae (Hot Gates) in August, 480 B.C.

In addition to an account of the battle, it provides information on movies, websites related to the battle, and items for sale relating to the event. I am pleased that the 700 Thespians who fought and died along side the 300 are given some credit at the site. It notes, "Therefore, the Thespians should be held with the highest esteem as the Spartan fallen. They distinguished themselves by remaining to fight and die with honor and courage along with the remaining Spartan heroes so that the rest of the Greek warriors could withdraw safely."

I did see 300 on Sunday night. I enjoyed the movie and even though it was a bit strange at times it was a good retelling of the Battle of Thermopylae. I am rather certain however that the Persians did not use Rhinos or elephants in the battle against the Greeks as the movie suggests.

From the site:

This website is dedicated to King Leonidas and the 300 Spartans, who along with 700 Thespians fought to the death defending the Pass of Thermopylae (Hot Gates) in August, 480 B.C. The Spartan and Thespian last stand has been immortalized in the works of Herodotus and glorified in the 1962 movie 'The 300 Spartans' starring Richard Egan, along with many other mediums consisting of artwork, books, statues, etc.

The legendary battle of Thermopylae was the focus of Steven Pressfield's 'Gates of Fire' which received many accolades and which will be visited once again with the premier of the Frank Miller movie '300'.

2 comments:

Navid said...

Thank you for the link!

As an Iranian, however, I am both concerned about the problems of representation in this film. I'm also concerned about what it says about our cultural fabric when we make a film like this in a period of tense deliberation between the United States and Iran.

I wrote on this issue on my blog, if you care to engage an alternative viewpoint.

Baron von Feldspar said...

I am not Greek or Persian. However at the root of our western civilization is Greece and all its works. Now we can look back to a time when we, that is our cultural ancestors, were nearly wiped out. Because of that we are naturally sympathetic to Greeks and their problems.

If you have an anticolonial viewpoint then the Greeks were right to resist Persian imperialism, however much some Greeks might admire aspects of Persian culture.