Friday, February 29, 2008

Working for Free on Leap Day

Today is February 29th, 2008. It is also Leap Day. While I could get excited about this special day which happens only every four years, I am having trouble being happy about it.

There is a good reason for this. It dawned on my as I came to work that I am working for free today. I get not a single penny for coming into work for Leap Day.

Like most professionals in academia, I am a salaried employee. I get the same amount of money every month no matter how many hours or days I work. It comes with the territory. However, the idea of having to work on a day that only exists every fourth year for free just seems wrong. If anything, I should be getting bonus holiday pay.

Hourly employees do not have this problem. Conversely, working on Leap Day will get the average hourly employee eight hours of extra pay today. My education is working against me!

Why do we have Leap Day? Wikipedia notes, "Although the modern calendar counts a year as 365 days, a complete revolution around the sun takes approximately 365 days and 6 hours. Every four years, an extra twenty-four hours have accumulated, so one extra day is added to that calendar to keep the count coordinated with the sun's apparent position."

Julius Caesar first came up with the Leap Day idea with his Julian Calendar reform. This does give me a good culprit to blame my free day of labor upon. It was the ancient Romans! They were real good at getting free labor out of people and their legacy lives on thousands of years later.

5 comments:

M-Dawg said...

Thank you for the depressing news!

Ugh! :-(

M said...

I am happy share the news. :]

There is some truth to the satire I have written but I am pleased to have my job at the university. I will gladly work the "free" day for the privilege of having the job I wake up to every day.

I hope you feel the same as well.

Miland

Anonymous said...

I don't understand your point. Surely you are paid at the end of the working week or two week period according to the number of days or hours worked?

M said...

"I don't understand your point. Surely you are paid at the end of the working week or two week period according to the number of days or hours worked?"

No, that would be an hourly employee. Salaried employees make the same amount of money regardless of the number of hours or days worked.

Miland

Anonymous said...

Ouch!